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Growing Moringa

Germinating your Moringa Seeds

  Soak the seeds in water for 24 hours.  Remove the soaked seeds, place them  on a wet paper towel and store in a plastic container with a clear lid.  Store in a dark place.                                                                                   

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    Without opening the lid, check the seeds daily for a week until you see them  sprout.  Make sure the paper towel is damp. You should see moisture on the inside of the lid. When they have sprouted, plant the seed in a four (4) inch pot with the roots down and the green sprout up.

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  After one month check to see if roots are coming out the bottom of the pot and if so, transplant into a 3 gallon pot.  Your tree can live up to a year in this size pot.  If you are planning to plant it in the ground, give it about 6 months in the 3 gallon pot and then follow these further instructions.   

 Moringa Oleifera trees can grow for a long time in pots, transplanting them once a year or sooner. Make sure there is good drainage, full sun and no heavy frost. To plant your Moringa tree in the ground:                  Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot it is in and twice the depth. Add good soil mixed already with peat moss, perilite, and egg shell bits (optional). Moringa trees need good drainage - avoid areas with clay. Water the soil in the hole before adding the Moringa tree. Place the tree in the center and pack soil mixture around and on top. Water again and use a fertilizer if desired following the instructions.* * Moringa is very fast growing, resilient to arid conditions and easy to care for. PRUNING  ** Very Important - if left to it's own it will grow to 30 feet and be difficult to harvest.  

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Follow these instructions for trees grown in a pot or in ground. CUT THE TOP 1-2 FEET OFF WHEN THE TREE IS 5-6 FEET TALL. This will force the energy down and create a fuller, leafier, bushier tree. Continue this practice always to maintain a full tree. Moringa is a very forgiving plant. It grows best at temperatures of 70-95 degrees. I have heard from  other growers that an unexpected dip down to 28 degrees the Moringa lost all its leaves and looked like a stick. But it all grew back!! However, a hard freeze will kill it.  When faced with this possibility,  lay blankets at its roots and shine lights on it.

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The more you prune your trees, the bushier they will become. Left to themselves, they will get tall and spindly, with their harvest of leaves, buds, blossoms, and pods out of reach.

Always prune from the TOP. Moringa trees can grow more than 15 feet their first year - given the right conditions. You do not want them to do that if you want to be able to easily reach their harvest. We like ours no taller than about 6-7 feet tall. Cut them back severely, from the top. Pinch off every other new top growth of leaves, and you will have a sturdy Moringa tree. 

For the first 6  - 8 months,  your Moringa Oliefera tree will only give you  leaves.  Look for flowers to form after that, and then the pods. 

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Moringa can grow indoors, in large containers - if you give them enough warmth, water and light. I recommend full spectrum plant lights. With very little care, your Moringa trees will give you years of eating pleasure as well as a feast for your eyes!  Order yours Seeds today!